15 Defunct College Football Bowl Games We Miss

Unpublished

Get the Athlon Sports Newsletter

From the Bacardi Bowl to the Bluebonnet Bowl, we list our favorite bygone bowls

15 Defunct College Football Bowl Games We Miss

The 35 bowl games on this year’s roster may be too many for some.

That’s fine. For some of us, that’s not enough. Not just because if the insatiable need for December and January college football. Bowl games — especially bad bowl games — offer a wide variety of ridiculous bowl names, wild destinations and “what were you thinking” ideas.

Bowl games have come and gone over the years. Some were successful, including the Bluebonnet Bowl, All-American Bowl and Freedom Bowl. Some were cool ideas like the Bacardi Bowl. And some were doomed from the start — a bowl game in Dayton? Really?

Here are 15 bowl games you won't see in December and January.

15 Defunct College Football Bowl Games We Miss

Aloha Bowl
Site: Honolulu (Aloha Stadium)
Years: 1982-2000
Technically, this is a defunct bowl, though a bowl game returned to Hawaii two years later for the imaginatively named Hawaii Bowl. The Aloha Bowl was played on Christmas Day for the final 14 games of its run and often featured ranked teams from major conferences. The Hawaii Bowl, on the other hand, is traditionally played on Christmas Eve and features Conference USA, Mountain West and WAC teams. Edge: Aloha Bowl.



All-American Bowl/Hall of Fame Classic
Site: Birmingham, Ala. (Legion Field)
Years: 1977-90
A second-tier bowl game for more than a decade, Birmingham eventually abandoned the All-American Bowl to host the SEC Championship Game, which moved to Atlanta two years later. A shame: This Birmingham game ended in 1990 before Pittsburgh ever had a chance to play in it.

Aviation Bowl
Site:
Dayton, Ohio (Welcome Stadium)
Year: 1961
As the hometown of the Wright brothers and the site of where they designed their flying machine, Dayton considers its the birthplace of aviation (the University of Dayton mascot is the Flyers). The Aviation Bowl, though, never really took flight, and New Mexico’s 28-12 win over Western Michigan in 1961 was the only bowl game in Dayton. Only 3,694 people attended the game.

Bacardi Bowl
Site: Havana, Cuba (Tropical Stadium)
Year: 1937
The first Bahamas Bowl will be played next season, but that won’t be the first bowl game played in the tropics. Not by a long shot. Auburn’s first bowl game was in pre-Castro Cuba on New Year’s Day 1937 in a 7-7 tie with Villanova. The Bacardi Bowl is the accepted name, but the game also went by the Rhumba Bowl or Cigar Bowl.

Bluebonnet Bowl
Site:
Houston (Rice Stadium/Astrodome)
Years: 1959-87
An equivalent to the Holiday or Alamo bowls, the Bluebonnet Bowl had the longest history of a now-defunct bowl, according to the Wall Street Journal. The Bluebonnet usually had a Texas team or a Southwest Conference team on one side. One exception: This Missouri-Georgia Tech meeting in 1962 called by legendary Cubs announcer Harry Caray:
 



Bluegrass Bowl
Site: Louisville, Ky. (Fairgrounds Stadium)
Year: 1958
Fairgrounds Stadium is now an eyesore from the Interstate in Louisville, especially compared to the Cardinals’ new facility. Not only did Louisville play football here, it hosted Oklahoma State’s 1958 bowl win over Florida State. The game was attended by a mere 7,000 people, but it’s more notable for being the first national television appearance for Howard Cosell.

California Bowl
Site: Fresno, Calif. (Bulldog Stadium)
Years: 1981-91
The game gave us one of the great bowl sponsors in the California Raisin Advisory Board. The claymation dancing and singing raisins were more memorable than any of the bowl matchups between the WAC and the MAC. The California Raisin Bowl is not to be confused with simply the Raisin Bowl, also held in Fresno from 1945-49.

Freedom Bowl
Site: Anaheim, Calif. (Anaheim Stadium)
Years: 1984-94
The Freedom Bowl featured a fair amount of star power in its decade of existence, including MVP performances from Chuck Long, Ty Detmer, Marshall Faulk and Tedy Bruschi.
 



Garden State Bowl
Site: East Rutherford, N.J. (Giants Stadium)
Years: 1978-81
The Garden State Bowl learned what the NFL may figure out in 2014: Postseason games in December and January are to be avoided. Rutgers and Temple played in the first two games here before embarking on lengthy bowl droughts. After four games, Giants Stadium became the site of the popular and much more successful (and warmer) Kickoff Classic, a game that ran in late August from 1983-2002.

Gotham Bowl
Site: New York (Yankee Stadium)
Years: 1961-62
The matchup between Nebraska and Miami in the 1962 game would be much more interesting decades later, but this game preceded Miami’s first national title by 21 years and featured Bob Devaney in only his first season as Nebraska’s coach. Still, the Gotham Bowl is such a great name. Unfortunately, the words “Gotham” and “football” probably shouldn’t go together. Thanks, Christopher Nolan.

Great Lakes Bowl
Site: Cleveland, Ohio
Year: 1947
This bowl was probably doomed from the get-go because “bowl destination” and “lake effect snow” don’t go together. The game featured only one matchup between major teams, but at least it was historically notable as the first bowl appearance and bowl win by then-Kentucky coach Bear Bryant in 1947.

International Bowl
Site: Toronto (Rogers Centre)
Years: 2007-10
In addition to being the first bowl game off American soil in 70 years, the International Bowl carries the distinction of being one of the first in an unfortunate trend of placing lower-tier bowl games in between New Year’s Day and BCS championship game. The demise of the Big East, 4-0 in this game against the MAC, and low attendance contributed to the demise of the game.

Oil Bowl
Site: Houston (Rice Stadium)
Years: 1946-47
Florida has oranges and tangerines, and Georgia has peaches. Makes sense for Texas to have the Oil Bowl, right?

Salad Bowl
Site: Phoenix (Montgomery Stadium)
Years: 1947-51
This game featured North Texas and Arizona State back when they were teachers’ colleges and when Drake, Dayton and Xavier went to bowl games. Not sure how it ended up a New Year’s Day bowl game. Like the Cherry Bowl, the Salad Bowl is virtually un-Google-able on the first try.

Silicon Valley Classic
Site: San Jose, Calif. (Spartan Stadium)
Years: 2000-2004
Back in the early 2000s, many games ended up with a dot com sponsor — galleryfurniture.com, EV1.net, Insight.com. Only one claimed all of Silicon Valley. The game went bust after the dot com bubble burst.

Exclude From Games: 
Exclude From Games

Home Page Infinite Scroll Left